The Revs Program at Stanford is proud to announce that the 10th Biennial Automotive History Conference will come to Stanford April 10-12, 2014. Various parts of the conference will take place at Stanford's Automotive Innovation Facility and many Stanford professors and researchers will have roles in the event.

The theme for the conference is 'The Evolution of Automotive Technology' — the continuing development of the motor vehicle and its process of manufacture over a 120-year history. Although considered by many to have reached a plateau a half-century ago, the industry and its products in recent years have entered a new phase of creative development addressing issues once thought resolved responding to new economic, social and environmental conditions through fundamental research.

The conference will include presentations by historians from American and foreign institutions and by professionals whose work is contributing to the expansion of knowledge and new practices in the motor industry. Each day’s sessions will close with a discussion of currently evolving automotive technology by a participant in the design process.

Stanford community members with valid ID can attend the conference free of charge but RSVP is required (please email adelet@stanford.edu). Non-Stanford members of the community can apply and make payment directly to SAH on their website.

A full conference schedule, subject to change, is listed below:

Program and Schedule
 
THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 2014
Board of Directors Meeting
9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Stratton Room
 
Registration
2:00 – 6:00 p.m. Hotel Entrance
 
WELCOME RECEPTION
6:30 - 8:00 p.m. Stratton Room and Patio
Greetings: Reilly Brennan Executive Director, Revs Program at Stanford
 
FRIDAY, APRIL 11, 2014
Continental Breakfast
7:30 – 8:30 a.m. – Lobby
8:30 - Shuttle bus to Automotive Innovation Facility on Stanford campus
 
MORNING SESSIONS
Chair: Arthur W. Jones
 
9:00 – 9:30 a.m.
“A Portuguese Hybrid Car from the Early 20th Century: A Case Study in Innovation towards Energy Saving”
Speaker: José Barros Rodrigues Engineer and Historian, Portugal
 
9:30 – 10:00 a.m.
“Making the African Car: Design, Tinkering, and Politics”
Speaker: Joshua Grace, Assistant Professor of History University of South Carolina
 
10:00 – 10:30 a.m.
“Building a Bricolage of Speed: Dirt Track Racecar Construction, 1920-1960”
Speaker: Alison Kreitzer University of Delaware
 
BREAK - 10:30 – 11:00 a.m.
 
11:00 – 11:30 a.m.
“On the Road, Auto-mobility in American Culture and Literature”
Speaker: Christina Ann Mesa Lecturer in American Studies, Stanford University
 
11:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
“License to Drive: A History of the Driver’s License from New York in 1914 to California in 2013”
Speaker: Eric Karl Roth Attorney and Legal Historian, Stanford University
 
12:00 – 12:30 p.m.
“Policing the Automotive Society”
Speaker: Sarah Seo Princeton University
 
LUNCH BUFFET – 12:30 – 2:00 p.m.
 
AFTERNOON SESSIONS
Chair: John A. Heitmann
 
2:00 – 2:30 p.m.
“On Balloon Tires into the Automotive Society: The Low Pressure Tire and Other Technologies of Heavy Truck Transportation”
Speaker: Jørgen Burchardt, Senior Researcher National Museum of Science and Technology, Denmark
 
2:30 – 3:00 p.m.
“Historical Development of Crankcase Engine Oils from the Model A to the Z4”
Speaker: William Chamberlin Research Engineer, Lubrizol Corporation
 
3:00 – 3:30 p.m.
“Innovations in Vehicle Coatings during the First Half of the 20th Century: Breaking a Bottleneck in Automobile Production”
Speaker: Gundula Tutt Conservator-Restorer Institut für Technologie der Malerei, ABK Stuttgart
 
BREAK – 3:30 – 4:00 p.m.
 
4:00 – 4:45 p.m.
“How We Use the Automobile at Stanford”
Featured Speaker: Christian Gerdes Associate Professor of Engineering Interim Director, Revs Program at Stanford
 
5:00 Shuttle bus return to hotel
 
Evening – Dinner on your own
 
SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014
 
Continental Breakfast
7:30 – 8:30 a.m. – Lobby
 
8:30 – Shuttle bus to Automotive Innovation Facility on Stanford campus
 
MORNING SESSIONS
Chair: Douglas Leighton
 
9:00 – 9:30 a.m.
“Firm Competitiveness and Postwar Economic Integration in Europe: The Case of Volkswagen in the ECSC and EEC”
Speaker: Grace Ballor, Department of History University of California, Los Angeles
 
9:30 – 10:00 a.m.
“Byers A. Burlingame and the Studebaker Corporation: Villain or Savior?”
Speaker: Robert Ebert, Professor Emeritus of Economics Baldwin-Wallace College
 
10:00 – 10:30 a.m.
“The Survival of Technical Traditionalism: Independent Manufacturers, Workers and Production Methods in the Age of Mass Production to 1930”
Speaker: Douglas Leighton Associate Professor of History Huron University College
 
BREAK – 10:30 – 11:00 a.m.
 
11:00 – 11:30 a.m.
“The Trailer Revolution”
Speaker: David Burel Department of History, Auburn University
 
11:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
“Fuel to Drive: A History of the Gas Station in the United States”
Speaker: Usua Amanam Revs Program at Stanford
 
12:00 – 12:30 p.m.
“Mexico, the United States and International Auto Theft”
Speakers: John Heitmann President, Society of Automotive Historians, Professor of History, University of Dayton
and Rebecca Morales, Independent Historian former curator, San Diego Automotive Museum
 
LUNCH BUFFET – 12:30 – 2:00 p.m.
 
AFTERNOON SESSIONS
Chair: Arthur W. Jones
 
2:00 – 2:30 p.m.
“Craft, Styling, Design: The Evolving Disciplines of Car Design in Great Britain”
Speaker: Helen Evenden Royal College of Art, London
 
2:30 – 3:00 p.m.
“The Molecular Interactions of Cleaning Solutions with Lacquered Vehicles”
Speaker: Owen Falk Department of Chemical Engineering Stanford University
 
3:00 – 3:30 p.m.
“3D Technology: Additive Manufacturing and Holographic Imaging Applications”
Speaker: John Marino Associate Professor, Business Technology Kent State University at Trumbull
 
BREAK – 3:30 – 4:00 p.m.
 
4:00 – 4:45 p.m.
“My Vision of a Feasible Future of Electric Vehicles and Society”
Featured Speaker: Masato Inoue Former Product Chief Designer of Nissan LEAF
 
5:00 Shuttle bus returns to hotel
 
CLOSING DINNER AND KEYNOTE ADDRESS
 
6:30 p.m. – Stratton Room
“Putting It All Together without a Workshop Manual”
Rudi Volti Professor Emeritus of Sociology, Pitzer College
 

 

 

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